selected projects


  • GTA Project

    Ontario, 2012 - 2015

    Due to the population expansion in the Toronto metropolitan area, the existing pipeline infrastructure had not kept up with the rising demand for natural gas. Enbridge’s solution was to add approximately 30 miles of 36-inch and 42-inch pipeline to increase the volume of natural gas being brought into the city. Most of this new line was installed in tight utility corridors throughout the greater Toronto area. With numerous roads, major highways, sensitive waterways, and utilities to be navigated, HDD and Direct Pipe proved to be valuable assets during planning, design, and construction. JDH&A provided design and construction monitoring for sixteen HDD and three Direct Pipe installations on the project between May 2012 and December 2015.

  • Sweeny midstream Pipelines

    Texas, 2014 - 2015

    This petroleum products pipeline system extends over 123 miles between Mont Belvieu and Freeport, Texas. Much of the system was installed in crowded utility corridors in the Houston metro area. This required HDD segments to be drilled to extremely tight directional tolerances. Many of the sites involved multiple lines with minimal horizontal separation. The longest crossing installed was beneath the Houston Ship Channel and extended over 2 miles. JDH&A provided construction monitoring for over 120 HDD crossings, observing and documenting HDD operations on as many as 8 crossings per day. HDD construction was successfully completed in October of 2015.

  • FLANAGAN SOUTH Pipeline

    Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma, 2012 - 2014

    This 36-inch crude oil pipeline originates in Pontiac, Illinois and extends roughly 590 miles across Missouri and Kansas to its termination in Cushing, Oklahoma. JDH&A was responsible for design and construction monitoring of twenty-two HDD crossings on the project, including a 9,000 foot crossing of the Mississippi River that is believed to be the longest 36-inch HDD crossing completed to date. Design of the HDD crossings began in June 2012 and construction of the last HDD crossing was completed in July 2014.

  • Keystone Pipeline

    nebraska, MISSOURI, ILLINOIS, kansas, Oklahoma, and TEXAS, 2009 - 2014

    This landmark, international crude oil pipeline extends from Hardisty, Alberta to the U.S. Gulf Coast, crossing many notable obstacles along the way. JDH&A provided HDD expertise on the U.S. portion of the project, assisting with design and implementation of seventy-two major HDD installations (twenty 30-inch and fifty-two 36-inch). JDH&A also provided HDD construction monitoring services over a cumulative total of 32 months at crossing locations scattered across six U.S. states.

  • Southeast Supply Header Project

    Louisiana and Mississippi, 2006 - 2008

    This 274-mile natural gas pipeline extends from the Perryville Hub in northeastern Louisiana to the Gulfstream Natural Gas System in southern Mobile County, Alabama. It is comprised of 42- inch and 36-inch welded steel pipe with a transmission capacity of one billion cubic feet per day. JDH&A was responsible for design and construction monitoring for all twenty-seven HDD crossings, including geotechnical investigations at all of the HDD sites and hydrographic surveying at the Mississippi River crossing. Design work began in 2006 with construction of all crossings completed in 2008.

  • Middletown to Norwalk 345 kv project

    Connecticut, 2005 - 2007

    This electric power transmission project involved five HDD crossings beneath waterways and rivers in congested urban environments throughout Connecticut. Crossing lengths ranged from approximately 700 feet up to 1,650 feet. Each crossing involved two parallel segments consisting of four 10-inch and one 8-inch HDPE conduit. JDH&A, working as a sub-consultant to Burns & McDonnell, provided HDD design and engineering services as well as construction quality assurance.

  • Hubline Project

    Massachusetts, 2000 - 2003

    This project circumvented the Boston Metropolitan area to connect a pipeline system bringing natural gas from Canada with a system delivering gas to the south. This highly innovative 30-inch offshore pipeline system included four state-of-the-art drilled crossings. The crossings were state-of-the-art not only because of their lengths, approaching 5,000 feet, and hard rock subsurface conditions, but also because each crossing required offshore operations. On two of the crossings, both the entry and exit points were offshore requiring all HDD operations to be conducted in the sensitive marine environment. JDH&A’s responsibilities included geotechnical investigation, feasibility analysis, detailed design and consultation during construction.

  • alliance pipeline

    United States and Canada, 1996 - 2000

    This high-pressure natural gas pipeline extending 1,900 miles from northern British Columbia to Chicago was designed and constructed to the highest environmental and safety standards required by regulatory bodies in both Canada and the United States. During the initial feasibility and permitting stage, JDH&A reviewed more than fifty major waterway crossings to determine the optimum crossing installation method. This was followed by design and construction monitoring for the HDD crossings in Canada and design consultation for the HDD crossings in the United States. All of the HDD crossings were completed by the summer of 2000.

  • Vector Pipeline

    Indiana, Michigan, and Ontario, 1998 - 2000

    The 348-mile, 42-inch Vector Pipeline transports approximately 1.3 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas from Joliet, Illinois, to parts of Indiana and Michigan and into Ontario, Canada. JDH&A's involvement began in the permitting phase with feasibility analysis of prospective HDD crossings and testimony before regulatory bodies. This was followed by detailed design and construction monitoring on eight HDD crossings. Construction was completed in 2000.

  • Colville River crossings

    Alaska, 1996 - 1999

    The Colville River Crossing for ARCO's Alpine Development consisted of four 4,300-foot HDD installations through permafrost in the Alaskan Arctic. Subsurface conditions tested the limits of HDD technology while North Slope winter construction conditions required work to be carried out on ice work pads in temperatures ranging to -50 degrees Fahrenheit. JDH&A provided the initial feasibility analysis that demonstrated to the owner and permitting authorities that HDD could be applied at the Colville River. This initial work was followed by consultation relative to design and construction methods and field engineering for quality assurance. Construction began in early 1998 and all of the crossings were completed by the spring of 1999. This project was recognized in April of 2000 as one of five finalists for the American Society of Civil Engineers Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award.

  • Maritimes & northeast Pipeline

    Nova Scotia to Massachusetts, 1996 - 1999

    This 886-mile pipeline extends from Nova Scotia through New Brunswick, Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where it delivers gas into pipeline systems in the Boston Metropolitan area. JDH&A held the HDD engineering position on the large multi-discipline design team assembled for this project. This involved field reconnaissance at more than 50 potential HDD crossing sites to evaluate HDD feasibility. Feasibility evaluation was followed by implementation of an extensive geotechnical exploration program for potential crossings in the State of Maine, production of design drawings for crossings in the U.S. and Canada, expert testimony before regulatory agencies, and consultation during the construction phase. All of the mainline crossings were completed in 1999.

  • Hudson River Crossing

    New York, 1992

    This Hudson River crossing is part of a 16-inch welded steel pipeline that delivers natural gas from the Iroquois Pipeline to Central Hudson's Roseton Generating Station. JDH&A functioned as design consultant to Central Hudson for this challenging crossing. This involved preliminary design and feasibility analysis, preparation of permit applications, geotechnical investigation, preparation of specifications and design drawings, and construction monitoring. The crossing, located near Poughkeepsie, New York, was approximately 4,500 feet in length. The geology at the site required a creative design involving a combination of cut and cover and trenchless techniques. Installation was completed in the spring of 1992. The crossing was recognized in 1993 as an Outstanding Engineering Achievement by the New York State Society of Professional Engineers.